New York Great Lakes

Included Counties: 
Chautauqua, Erie, Niagara, Orleans, Genesee, Monroe, Wayne, Cayuga (partial), Oswego, Onondaga (partial), Jefferson (partial)
Watersheds: 
Black, Buffalo-Eighteenmile, Cattaraugus, Chaumont-Perch, Chautauqua-Conneaut, Conewango, French, Indian, Irondequoit-Ninemile, Lake Erie, Lake Ontario, Lower Genesee, Niagara, Oak Orchard-Twelvemile, Oneida, Oswegatchie, Oswego, Salmon-Sandy, Seneca, Upper Allegheny, Upper St. Lawrence

Geography

The Great Lakes Climatic Division of New York stretches along the southern shores of Lake Erie, The Niagara River, and Lake Ontario. It includes a tremendously diverse landscape and several large population centers.

Overview

Aptly, the Great Lakes Climate Division of New York experiences strong lake effects from Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. The area sees significant snowfall during the winter months. Snow covers the ground more often than not from late December into early March, and more than half of the annual snowfall comes from lake-effect precipitation. In the eastern portions of the division, when Lake Erie freezes over, typically in late January, lake-effect snowfall becomes rare. In areas more directly affected by Lake Ontario, lake effect precipitation may continue throughout the winter months as Lake Ontario typically freezes over less completely. The central areas of the division experience sunny, dry and mild summers due to cool southwest breezes off the lakes. The lakes also stabilize convection and limit thunderstorm development through much of the summer. As lake temperatures warm into August and lose most of their stabilizing capacity, showers and humid days become more common.

Changes In Precipitation

 in.cm.%
Annual5.213.213.72
Winter0.40.94.13
Spring0.41.04.42
Summer1.94.919.45
Fall2.46.022.90

Linear best-fit changes are calculated over the period 1950-2012. Percentage changes are calculated relative to the 1951-1980 historical reference period.

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Changes In Temperature

 °F°C
Annual2.11.1
Winter2.61.4
Spring2.81.6
Summer1.50.8
Fall1.10.6

Linear best-fit changes are calculated over the period 1950-2012. Percentage changes are calculated relative to the 1951-1980 historical reference period.

Seasonal Precipitation

Seasonal Temperature