Southeastern Wisconsin

Included Counties: 
Washington, Ozaukee, Waukesha, Milwaukee, Racine, Walworth, Kenosha
Watersheds: 
Des Plaines, Kishwaukee, Lake Michigan, Manitowoc-Sheboygan, Milwaukee, Pike-Root, Upper Fox, Upper Rock

Geography

Wisconsin Climate Division 9 is bordered by Illinois to the south and Lake Michigan to the east. The land cover is a mixture of urban development, forests, and agriculture. The terrain is mostly flat.

Overview

The climate of Wisconsin’s Southeastern Climatic Division is strongly influenced by Lake Michigan when winds are out of the east. Under these conditions, cooler air from Lake Michigan brings the division mild summer temperatures, while increased precipitation may accompany the warmer fall and early winter temperatures. In the late winter as ice builds up on the lakes, temperature variations are usually similar to those at inland locations. Because the day-to-day weather is controlled by the movement of pressure systems across the continent, this area seldom experiences prolonged periods of hot, humid weather in the summer or extreme cold during the winter. Precipitation is well-distributed throughout the growing season, but more precipitation tends to fall during the spring and summer months during afternoon thunderstorms.
 

Changes In Precipitation

 in.cm.%
Annual4.010.112.48
Winter1.12.826.70
Spring1.53.817.37
Summer0.30.82.69
Fall0.92.311.46

Linear best-fit changes are calculated over the period 1950-2012. Percentage changes are calculated relative to the 1951-1980 historical reference period.

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Changes In Temperature

 °F°C
Annual2.41.3
Winter3.51.9
Spring3.11.7
Summer1.30.7
Fall1.40.8

Linear best-fit changes are calculated over the period 1950-2012. Percentage changes are calculated relative to the 1951-1980 historical reference period.

Seasonal Precipitation

Seasonal Temperature